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Young ProCan researcher given prestigious awards

22/Apr/2020  
A determined young cancer researcher at CMRI has been recognised for her work with two prestigious awards in recent months.

Dr Rebecca Poulos works in the ProCan team at CMRI, in the Cancer Data Science area. She is also a National Health and Medical Research Council Early Career Fellow.

The two-awards Rebecca received were the inaugural Outstanding PhD Thesis Award at the Australian Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Society conference and the Ken Mitchellhill Young Investigator Award at the 25th Annual Lorne Proteomics Symposium.

Dr Poulos said her most recent award as Young Investigator was particularly fulfilling because it was for work with the ProCan team.




“Being able to share our research at a major conference provided a fantastic opportunity to network with other researchers and to have valuable discussions about our findings and possible future directions for research,’’ Dr Poulos said.
 
“The presentation also opened the door for new collaborative opportunities, where we can hopefully find research synergies across institutions.  
 
“The award gave great visibility to the research that we are doing in ProCan, and I hope our findings will be important to our field moving forward,’’ she said. “It is also particularly helpful as an early career researcher to have opportunities like this, which are really helpful career milestones.’’

Dr Poulos said she particularly enjoyed working at CMRI and the ProCan team because of the diverse background of the researchers.

“I get to work with a team of people from different backgrounds and disciplines, so there’s a lot of opportunity to learn,’’ she said. “Science is a wonderful career for those wanting the freedom to pursue ideas. It’s a career that encourages you to be creative and investigate really important questions about how the world works. We have a really exciting goal of using medical research to come up with better cancer treatments for kids and adults. The project is both challenging and extremely satisfying. ‘’