Finding cures for children's genetic diseases

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WHAT’S THE FUSS?

21/Oct/2015  
We’re proud to be supporting “What’s the Fuss?”, an initiative designed to raise awareness for the importance of investing in health and medical research in order sustain our nation’s future, specifically by  continued support for the Medical Research Future Fund (MRFF).

The campaign, which launched this week, provides a  platform for people to express how and why investment into medical research is so crucial to the future health of Australians. Some of the research advocates showcased are: Carrie Bickmore, Ita Buttrose, Natasha Stott Despoja, former ‘Australians of the Year’ Sir Gustav Nossal, Professor Patrick McGorry and Simon McKeon, along with other community and business leaders, patients, and medical researchers from all around Australia 

CMRI will be sharing not only our research successes but also the passion and dedication of all our research teams. They ask the difficult questions in order to find the best answers for providing children in Australia and around the world a healthier future. Here’s a few of CMRI’s world-class achievements over the past 57 years:
  • Development of a new class of drugs that could one day treat epilepsy, cancer and other diseases
  • Showing the composition of human telomerase, a key target for finding cures for 85% of all cancers
  • Discovering the ALT mechanism, important for finding cures for the other 15% of cancers, including aggressive brain cancers

MRFF Action Group Chair, Peter Scott is also encouraging everyday people to share their stories about the need for medical research through the 'What’s the fuss?' website.

We want our website to become a home for people to share stories about themselves and their loved ones, be they stories about how medical research has touched their lives, or stories about medical conditions where more research can make a difference."

What’s the Fuss?” Answer:  Australian health and medical research provides hope for new discoveries leading to better diagnostics, treatments and potentially cures for the major health issues affecting everyone.
 

Every day we hear stories about people suffering or dying prematurely with medical conditions that should be preventable or curable if we invest the money to conduct the necessary research” Mr Scott said. 
 
“The fuss is for all of us, for our future, and for the important role the MRFF will play in that.”